Combating racial stereotypes through film: An examination of strategies advanced by the film “a day without a Mexican”

Combating racial stereotypes through film: An examination of strategies advanced by the film “a day without a Mexican”

Author: 
Timothy E. Martin, Jr., Levi Pressnell, Daniel Turner, Terrence A. Merkerson and Andrew C. Kwon
Abstract: 

There are many diverging opinions on the issue of immigration and in 2012 one specific cultural group received large attention within national media. One movie offers a portrayal of what life would be like in California if those of Hispanic ethnicity suddenly disappeared. Director Sergio Arau’s “A Day without a Mexican” (2004) is a satirical comedy that seeks to demonstrate how important Hispanics are to California. This movie intends to be comedic while conveying a persuasive message about the important role of Hispanics in America. Although race in the media has been traditionally focused on escalating negative portrayals of various ethnic groups, there is an apparent trend in employing humor in media to combat stereotypes and as a form of protest. This paper explores the types of rhetorical devices and strategies the film “A Day without a Mexican” (2004) uses to combat race issues, confront stereotypes, and then outlines the four main strategies discovered within the film.

Paper No: 
107